Differences in the predatory behaviour of male and female ladybird beetles (Coccinellidae)

  • Jan Šipoš 1) Department of Biodiversity Research, Global Change Research Centre AS CR, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic 2) Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu, 771 46 Olomouc, Czech Republic
  • Emma Kvastegård Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • Kwabena Owusu Baffoe Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • Kawshar Sharmin Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • Robert Glinwood Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
  • Pavel Kindlmann 1) Department of Biodiversity Research, Global Change Research Centre AS CR, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic 2) Institute of Environmental Studies, Charles University, Benátská 2, CZ-12801 Prague 2, Czech Republic

Abstract

We investigated the response of males and females of ladybirds to different densities of aphids. This was studied using Coccinella septempunctataas the predator and Rhopalosiphum padi as the prey. Interactions between this ladybird and prey were observed on barley(Hordeum vulgare). We established aphid colonies on barley at three different densities, 16, 32 and 84 aphids per pot. Adult ladybirdsplaced in these colonies were then observed for 10 minutes or until they flew away. We hypothesized that females should consume moreaphids than males per unit time. The results of this experiment revealed that the risk of aphid mortality per plant depended on the sex ofthe ladybird beetle. Female ladybirds consumed significantly more aphids than males per unit time. In addition the turning rate and timespent resting differed between the sexes.
Published
2012-06-29
Section
Articles