The use of a transport simulation model (AIMSUN) to determine the environmental effects of pedestrianization and traffic management in the center of Thessaloniki

  • Evangelos Mintsis Centre for Research and Technology Hellas – Hellenic Institute of Transport, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki
  • Michael Belibassakis Faculty of Rural and Surveying Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki
  • George Mintsis Faculty of Rural and Surveying Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki
  • Socrates Basbas Faculty of Rural and Surveying Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki
  • Magda Pitsiava-Latinopoulou Faculty of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki

Abstract

Traffic congestion in urban areas results in increased energy consumption and vehicle emissions. Traffic management that alleviates traffic congestion also mitigates the environmental effects of vehicular traffic. This study uses the transport simulation model AIMSUN to evaluate the environmental effect of a set of traffic management and pedestrianization schemes. The effects of the pedestrianization of specific sections of roads, converting two-way roads into one-way roads for traffic and changing the direction of flow of traffic along one-way roads were simulated for different areas of Thessaloniki’s city centre network. The assessment of the environmental effect was done by determining the predicted fuel consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and air pollutants. Fuel consumption and the environmental indicators were quantified directly using the fuel consumption and emissions model in AIMSUN. A typical weekday morning peak period, between 09:00am–10:00am, was simulated and the demand data obtained using a macroscopic traffic assignment model previously developed for the wider area of Thessaloniki. The results presented in this paper are for network-wide simulation statistics (i.e. fuel consumed, carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM)).

Published
2016-06-19
Section
Articles